BYU’s Information Technology Enterprise Architecture

BYU’s Enterprise Architecture framework consists of three distinct architecture types as represented in the diagram below:

  • Business Architecture
  • Information Architecture
  • Technology Architecture

All three of the architecture types, Business, Information and Technology architectures, lie within the context of Information Availability and Security (as illustrated in the diagram). This is intended to emphasize that enterprise business priorities and risk are considered and evaluated from the beginning of potential IT endeavors rather than as an afterthought.


BYU’s framework is based on the TOGAF model and draws extensively from NIH’s Enterprise Architecture model.


Business Architecture Information Architecture Technology Architecture Availability Security BYU Enterprise Architecture

Business Architecture

Business Architecture documents and models an organization’s policies, processes, work activities, artifacts, and assets. Specifically, Business Architecture answers the following questions concerning BYU's organizations and processes:

  • What do they do?
  • Who does it?
  • Why do they do it?
  • How do they do it?
  • When do they do it?
  • Where do they do it?


Information Architecture

Information Architecture documents and models key information assets, the applications that use them to enable business processes, and defines how applications and information together support the enterprises functions. The information architecture also specifies which parts of the business process are supported by each application and where each type of data is stored and managed.

BYU’s Information Architecture is comprised of two sub-architectures:

  • Information and Data Architecture – Using data models, the Information and Data Architecture identifies the information and data BYU manages to perform its mission.  For example, access and distribution models identify BYU enterprise data stores and information flows.
  • Applications and Systems Architecture – represents the IT application portfolio, the models for how applications are integrated, and identifies the business systems that enable and support the execution of BYU’s business processes. 


Technology Architecture

Technology Architecture represents BYU’s technical infrastructure and the specific hardware and software technologies that support BYU’s information systems.  The Technology Architecture consists of the following domains:

  • Platform – consists of the combination of software, middleware, hardware infrastructure and development frameworks that enable the development, deployment, operation, integration and management of applications.
  • Systems Management – consists of the technical tools used to collect and analyze data that measure BYU system performance to improve system availability, performance, and reliability.
  • Networks – consist of the technical elements required to provide data and Internet connectivity and communication internal and external to BYU.


Information Availability and Security

Business, Information, and Technology architectures lie within the context of Information Availability and Security (as illustrated in the diagram). The diagram also shows that Enterprise business priorities and risk are considered and evaluated from the beginning of potential IT endeavors rather than as an afterthought.